artroom5

5 Kent Street, Henley Beach SA

 

Exhibition: October 2018

6-28 October
Open Thursday to Sunday, 11am to 6pm


Sophie Corso • Peter Drew • Jake Holmes • Andy Petrusevics

 

Artroom5 invite

 

Sophie Corso, MA Visual Arts and Design, Uni SA looks at the whimsical play of human interactions with the world around us. She works across multi-media materials to create an inviting interactive space for the viewer. In 2016 Sophie won a FELTspace Graduate Award. Sophie’s most recent exhibition was at FELTspace in TRAFFIC JAM, 2017.

Peter Drew MA, Research, Glasgow School of Art. His artworks have been exhibited at the Art Gallery of South Australia, Flinders University City Gallery and the National Gallery of Australia, though his most prominent work is installed on city streets. Recently he installed thirty-six large scale posters in Adelaide’s CBD depicting drawings, stories and poems by asylum seekers. His process is grounded in the traditions of Australian poster art and its role in shaping national and regional identity. One of his subjects is Monga Khan, an Indian born Hawker. Monga Khan was granted exemptions to the White Australia Policy, and it is histories like this that embody Australian ideals such as determination and courage. The photograph of a Chinese woman aims to get people thinking about what constitutes a 'real Australian' in his poster campaign titled 'What is a real Aussie?'. The woman featured in this poster is Dorothy Sym Choon, a member of the Sym Choon family of Adelaide, who owned a number of shops in Adelaide, including 'Miss Gladys Sym Choon' in Rundle Street. Dorothy Sym Choon, sister of Gladys, had her photo taken in 1920 for her exemption to the White Australia Policy. The photograph can be seen on the National Archives of Australia website at recordsearch.naa.gov.au

Peter’s posters draw on the ongoing international refugee crisis for context. The ability to distil massively complicated issues into simple posters that resonate strongly, is fundamental to Peter’s success. It’s a skill he solidified while studying psychology and philosophy.

Jake Holmes studied printmaking at Adelaide College of the Arts and works in printmaking, drawing, stick and poke, paint and comics. His work emerges from the tradition of political posters and printmaking. He has been invited to speak at the National Gallery of Australia on his practice and exhibits regularly, has completed mural commissions, podcasts and teaches at schools. In 2018 Holmes returned from a residency in Rajasthan, South Australia’s sister state in India, where he worked alongside local artists to create collaborative art and teach as part of a state government initiative. He is Co-founder of Tooth and Nail Studio; a communal art studio in Adelaide and a founding member of PRINT CULT a group of seven contemporary Australian printmakers.

A recent mural was completed by Jake and Joel van Moore on the wall of Goodwood’s Capri cinema. In 2018 Jake ran a print workshop with Emily Floyd at ACE Open.

Andy Petrusevics BA, Grad Dip in Fine Art, Uni SA is a contemporary visual artist who works across all media forms since 2014 and has produced film work for illuminart projects. His work can be found in many private and gallery collections in Australia, including the Art Gallery of South Australia and the National Gallery in Canberra. His work has been exhibited in numerous group and solo shows including at the CACSA, buzz, fizz, pop in 2011 and the AEAF, ebelief in 2009. Andy has shown in the Adelaide Festival twice, in particular in the Adelaide Biennial in 2006 with the installation work ethink and laminex Malevich. For 14 years he worked as a Graphic Designer at the ABC in Adelaide where he contributed to national programs such as Poh’s KitchenThe Cook and the Chef and George Negus Tonight. Andy has been a senior storyteller and animator with illuminart since 2014, working on public architectural projection across Australia, from Coffs Harbour (Qld) to Exmouth (WA), notably with permanent installation at the SLSA and on North Tce, Adelaide during the Adelaide Fringe. Andy was a presenter in the Adelaide Festival of Ideas in 2017. He exhibited the Dora Maar video and paintings at Praxis In 2017 and in 2018 at Riddoch Art Gallery in Internal Forces curated by Dr Linda Walker.

 

Next Exhibition: November 2018

Jude Adams

Narratives from the Family Album
November 3 to 25, 2018
Open Thursday to Sunday, 11am to 6pm

 

November at Artroom5

November at Artroom5

Jude Adams has a decades-spanning career in the visual arts covering a range of practices and disciplines. The thread linking her work, whether visual, text-based or performative, is a commitment to feminism and the significance of women's material practice. In the 1970s, Adams became an active member of the Women's Art Movement (Sydney 1974-76) (Adelaide 1978-85) and coordinated the Lovely Motherhood Show (1981), a collective-based exhibition that, like other 'memory cycle' projects, sought to 'turn down the racket of patriarchy'. More recently, Adams has participated in the resurgence of women-only collectives, such as Feminist Renewal Art Network (FRAN) and FRANFEST (2017). For most of her career, Adams has been involved in art education, teaching one of the first 'women and art' courses (1976) and subsequently, as a lecturer in art history and theory (UniSA). On retiring from academia, she has re-engaged with an art practice that is focused on recovery and reinterpretation.

Narratives from the Family Album
Exhibition Description:
In the current spirit of archival-retrieval, the exhibition, Narratives from the Family Album re-visits the period of second-wave feminist art. The aim, however, was not to reference or reenact works but rather to recover my own 'lost', forgotten or incomplete works. This process of return loosens the concept of linear time, thereby opening a space for the work of recovery, reappraisal, reformulation and repair. Framed by the idea of temporal fluidity Narratives from the Family Album includes works from the period of 1970s feminism, works that have undergone a makeover and works that were made across time. The exhibition draws on outmoded objects and technologies of representation such as the snapshot, the Polaroid and the photocopy in addressing gender, narrativity and identity.